About MSCS program

MSCS Program Study Plan

We suggest 6 study concentrations for students in the MSCS program

Concentration 1: General CS Concentration 2: Massive Data Analytics Concentration 3: AI/Machine Learning,
Concentration 4: Robotics Concentration 5: Systems/Security Concentration 6: Vision/Visualization/Graphics

Concentration Detail

Subject Mathematical Foundation Algorithmic Foundation Tools/Syst for Massive Data Knowledge Discovery Visualization

Course Table

UGrad Basic Core Advanced Non CS &
Seminars
Category A
Algorithm
334 / 512
501
513
521
529
596
514
522
711:558
Complexity
452 / 508
509
538
540
Numerical
324
510
Statistics
954 : 581
960 : 563
960 : 565
960 : 588
Category B
Arch
505
507
OS/DS
518
519
545
Networking
552
553
67x : 
Cloud Computing
Cm/PL
415
515
516
67x  
Parallel Prog
Security
544
546
547
67x : 
Cryptography
DB
336
527
539
541
AI
520
530
532
533
598
ML
535
543
550
536
Graphics
428
523
67x : 
Game Science
Vision\InfoVis
534
526
580
332 : 561
332 : 562
332 : 570
Robotics
560
562

Lamp

Program Course Requirements:

In order to ensure that the students have good preparation in several of the basic fields of computer science, the department has specified three categories of courses (Category A, Category B, and Category C). Within the first two categories, the courses are divided into three "advisory levels" (Basic, Core, Advanced). Category C consists of Capstone class, CS554, CS555 (these classes are not listed in the table above)

Each student will complete 36 credits. They will include 18 credits covering Basic and Core computer science classes from Categories A and B, 12 credits of specialized courses from categories A, B and C and a culminating sequence of six credits dedicated to complete an MS Thesis, an MS Capstone Project, an MS essay, or a special internship class. A few selected classes from other departments are allowed for inclusion in specialized study plans as long as they are approved by the Computer Science faculty.

Students pursuing the MS in CS will complete 12 courses (with at least 10 courses with grade of B or better) divided as follows:

  • Two courses (6 credits) of category A, with a grade of B or better

  • Two courses (6 credits) of category B, with a grade of B or better

  • Two courses (6 credits) from the union of categories A or B

  • Four courses (12 credits) from the list of courses acceptable for CS graduate credit, including courses from categories A, B, and C, acceptable undergrad courses, approved courses in other departments, CS seminars, and independent study. However, at most one of the four courses may be an independent study.

  • A culminating sequence (6 credits) consisting of:

    • Two additional courses from the union of categories A, B and C, plus an MS essay approved according to the requirements of the School of Graduate Studies. (Capstone courses in category C are structured so that the student will be able to produce suitable written work during the course itself)

    • 6 credits of MS Thesis research 704, 705, 706 plus an MS thesis defended successfully according to the requirements of the School of Graduate Studies.

    • 6 credits of 601, 602 and successful completion of the PhD qualifying exam in Computer Science. (In this case, the PhD qualifying paper will satisfy the writing requirement of the School of Graduate Studies).

  • In addition, to align with CPT rules, we require all MS students to have a practical experience, which can be fulfilled in one of the following ways:

    • taking an independent study with grade of B or better

    • taking a category C class with grade of B or better

    • taking the internship class 198:844 with grade of B or better

  • For more Classes, Pre-requisites, and Schedules, go to: https://sis.rutgers.edu/soc/

    Essay/Thesis Requirements:

    In addition to the coursework requirements for the M.S. degree that are established by the School of Graduate Studies, the student must choose either the Essay Option or Thesis Option as described below. The essay or thesis must be written in English (except that some portion may require a computer language, with English documentation), it must be the student's own work, and it must demonstrate the student's facility for expository writing.

    Essay Option:

    • The student must write and submit an expository paper in a field of computer science that was covered in the student's course work. It may be a paper written as part of a course in computer science, or it may be based on such a course. The essay must be appropriately formatted and contain: Title, Author(s), Abstract, and References. A paper that has previously been submitted for a course must have received a grade of B or higher. A paper with multiple authors may only be submitted by one student with written permission of the co-authors. Corresponding presentation slides are required with all essay submissions. When relevant, a video and documentation or user's manual are recommended but not required. No extra credit is given for the preparation of the essay. The essay must be approved by a member of the Graduate Faculty of the Department of Computer Science followed by the MS Director.

    Thesis Option:

    • The student must write a Master's Thesis and must register for exactly six credits of 198:704-706. Upon initial registration, the student is required to provide the MS Director with written confirmation from the faculty member agreeing to supervise their thesis.

    • The Master's Thesis must be a written account of a critical and scholarly investigation in an area of computer science. It may represent: (a) a piece of independent research (extensions and improvements of work in a given part of the field are acceptable at a level of novelty which is less than that required for a doctoral thesis); (b) a work of synthesis that gives new significance and insight to previously-known results; or (c) an important constructive contribution to the development of a computer application. The thesis may not be a digest of known results from the literature, a summary of a published report, company classified or government classified material, or dependent for its background on other non-available reports. The thesis topic should be chosen by mutual agreement between the student and their faculty supervisor. The thesis must be approved by the student's thesis committee. The committee consists of the thesis supervisor and two other faculty members who are determined in consultation with the thesis supervisor. The advisor and members of the thesis committee must be members of the Graduate Faculty in Computer Science.

    • In addition to submitting a copy of the completed Master's Thesis to the MS Director, the student is required to follow all thesis formatting, content, and submission guidelines from the School of Graduate Studies.

    Degree Completion Processing:

    There are several forms that must be filled out and submitted by the appropriate deadlines in order for the student who has fulfilled the above requirements to receive a Master's Degree. It is the student's responsibility that all necessary paperwork be completed on time. Information and forms can be obtained from the MS Administrative Assistant


MSCS Introduction - The Master Program in the Department of Computer Science - Rutgers University

Description

The Division of Computer and Information Sciences in New Brunswick was established at Rutgers in 1969 as the Computer Science Department. Programs leading to a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science are offered by the undergraduate colleges at Rutgers. The faculty of the division are members of the School of Arts and Sciences. The Graduate Program in Computer Science, which is a program in the Graduate School, offers courses of study leading to an M.Sc, Masters in Data Science or a Ph.D. in Computer Science. (The Master of Philosophy degree is available to doctoral candidates who have fulfilled certain requirements except for completing a dissertation.)

In 2001 the university decided to upgrade the status of Computer Science to the Division of Computer and Information Sciences, DCIS, within SAS. This follows the model of the Division of Life Sciences wich was created earlier. The Division includes the Department of Computer Science and several research centers. DCIS will eventually be led by the Area Dean just like the other 5 divisions within the SAS. The formation of the Division reflects high priority which computer sciences enjoys within the SAS. The Division intends to grow to 60 faculty and several strong, externally funded research centers in new exciting areas.

There are about 114 full-time and 28 part-time graduate students in the division. Between January 1990 and May 2006, the division had granted 155 Ph.D's, and many Master's degrees.

At present, there are 39 full-time faculty members in the New Brunswick Division of Computer and Information Sciences. Faculty research interests include algorithms, artificial intelligence (with applications to design, genetics, law, medicine), cognitive science, combinatorics, compilers, complexity theory, computational geometry, computational linguistics, computational molecular biology, data structures, distributed systems, graphics, knowledge representation, robotics, machine learning, mathematical programming, mobile computing, networks, numerical analysis, optimization, parallel computing/systems, software engineering and vision.

The Laboratory for Computer Science Research (LCSR) is associated with the division. Its main function is to provide a center for computer science research in the University and in particular to provide the computer and clerical support for that work. Computer science grant supported research projects are administered through the LCSR.

Rutgers University is located in New Brunswick, New Jersey. The University has an excellent library, an art museum, active theater groups, and an outstanding music program, with internationally known resident and visiting performers. The excellent sports facilities include a new gym with several swimming pools and places to work out; the new gym is half a block from the Division of Computer and Information Sciences. New Brunswick is on the main railway line running from Boston (and Montreal) to Florida, via New Haven, New York City, Princeton, Philadephia, Washington, D.C., etc. It is also on the bus route that runs between Princeton and New York City. Buses and trains run every half hour during the week days, less often other times. It is about an hour's drive to New York City, an hour and a half to Philadelphia, a half an hour's drive to Princeton (southeast), as well as AT&T Research, Lucent/Bell Labs and Bellcore (northwest).


Admission Requirements

In addition to the general admission criteria of the Graduate School, the department requires that applicants to the M.S. program have completed an accredited undergraduate program in Computer Science, or at least taken the core prerequisite courses for the undergraduate degree as listed below:

A substantial background in mathematics, especially in calculus (as in 640:151-152), linear algebra (as in 640:250), finite mathematics (as in 198:205), probability/combinatorics (as in 198:206), and numerical analysis (as in 198:323). Such background should include at least two semesters of calculus and one semester in each of the other areas.

Working knowledge of high level languages (as in 198:111), data structures (as in 198:112), computer architecture and assembly language (as in 198:211), algorithm design and analysis (as in 198:344), and some elective courses in advanced undergraduate areas, such as programming languages and compilers (as in 198:314, 415), operating systems (as in 198:416), distributed systems (as in 198:417), information systems (as in 198:336), networks (as in 198:352), etc.

(Short descriptions of undergraduate courses offered by the department can be found in Computer Science Undergraduate Course Synopses list.)

All applicants are required to take the aptitude part of the GRE examination (verbal, analytic and mathematical reasoning sections) with the exception of applying from the following countries:
  China
  Iran

Criteria for admission currently include:
An academic record (undergraduate and previous graduate work) that shows distinction (B+ or higher) in Computer Science, Mathematics and related fields. (The mean GPA for a recent entering class of students was 3.62; this included Master's students, with and without financial aid. )

High score on all the GRE examinations required, the TOEFL exam, or IELTS in the case of foreign students. (The minimum GRE scores for incoming students is: Verbal 150, Quantitative 160; the mean TOEFL score was 92; the mean for IELTS was 7.0)

Our MS and PhD programs require applicants to submit their GRE and TOEFL scores (or Duolingo) if these tests are available online or in person in their countries. We will waive the requirement for applicants residing in China or Iran, but encourage them to submit the scores if possible. For the list of countries who offer tests please see ETS Updates due to COVID-19.

Strong letters of recommendation.
A clear statement, about one page in length, outlining the reasons why the applicant wishes to pursue graduate study in computer science. (If appropriate, please specify one or more areas of particular interest, to help us assign advisors. See section 5 for a list of areas.)

The standards are higher for those awarded teaching assistantships or other forms of financial aid.

More specific information for international applicants is available through the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions.

Link:Application link for MSCS Program >>                    


Apply now

Start your application at the Graduate Admission website:

Link:Application link for MSCS Program                       

For the Spring semester: International, September 15th. MS applications only ; United States citizens as well as green card holders: October 15th.

For the Fall semester: February 1st for International MS applicants; United States citizens and green card holders MS applicants: March 1st.

Graduation Requirements for M.S. Degrees (cohorts beginning prior to Fall 2020)

To complete the Master of Science in Computer Science degree, students must present 30 credits satisfying the requirements listed below, yielding at least a B average and include no more than two C grades. In addition to the coursework, a student must write and submit an Essay or Thesis according to the provided guidelines.

Program Course Requirements:
MS Students must complete 30 credits (10 courses) divided as follows:

  • Two courses (6 credits) from category A with a grade of B or better

  • Two courses (6 credits) from category B with a grade of B or better

  • Four courses (12 credits) from the union of categories A and B

    • a. For the thesis option the 704/705/706 credits can count as two of these four courses

  • Two courses (6 credits) each of at least 3 credits that can include:

    • a. Graduate CS courses and seminars

    • b. Undergraduate courses that are accepted for graduate credit

    • c. Approved courses in other departments

Please note that NO Independent study credits (601/602) CAN count for the course requirement for MS students.

Courses that are relevant to the graduate program in Computer Science may also be taken in the following Rutgers programs:

  • Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Cognitive Sciences, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Linguistics, Mathematics, Operations Research, Philosophy, Psychology, and Statistics.

A list of approved courses from these departments.

Students may also take courses of special interest to them at Princeton University (Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Philosophy), in accordance with a cooperative arrangement between Rutgers and Princeton.

Students may register for internships/CPT using the zero-credit course 16:198:844 "Research Internship".

Essay/Thesis Requirements:

In addition to the coursework requirements for the M.S. degree that are established by the School of Graduate Studies, the student must choose either the Essay Option or Thesis Option as described below. The essay or thesis must be written in English (except that some portion may require a computer language, with English documentation), it must be the student's own work, and it must demonstrate the student's facility for expository writing.

Essay Option:

  • The student must write and submit an expository paper in a field of computer science that was covered in the student's course work. It may be a paper written as part of a course in computer science, or it may be based on such a course. The essay must be appropriately formatted and contain: Title, Author(s), Abstract, and References. A paper that has previously been submitted for a course must have received a grade of B or higher. A paper with multiple authors may only be submitted by one student with written permission of the co-authors. Corresponding presentation slides are required with all essay submissions. When relevant, a video and documentation or user's manual are recommended but not required. No extra credit is given for the preparation of the essay. The essay must be approved by a member of the Graduate Faculty of the Department of Computer Science followed by the MS Director.

Thesis Option:

  • The student must write a Master's Thesis and must register for exactly six credits of 198:704-706. Upon initial registration, the student is required to provide the MS Director with written confirmation from the faculty member agreeing to supervise their thesis.

  • The Master's Thesis must be a written account of a critical and scholarly investigation in an area of computer science. It may represent: (a) a piece of independent research (extensions and improvements of work in a given part of the field are acceptable at a level of novelty which is less than that required for a doctoral thesis); (b) a work of synthesis that gives new significance and insight to previously-known results; or (c) an important constructive contribution to the development of a computer application. The thesis may not be a digest of known results from the literature, a summary of a published report, company classified or government classified material, or dependent for its background on other non-available reports. The thesis topic should be chosen by mutual agreement between the student and their faculty supervisor. The thesis must be approved by the student's thesis committee. The committee consists of the thesis supervisor and two other faculty members who are determined in consultation with the thesis supervisor. The advisor and members of the thesis committee must be members of the Graduate Faculty in Computer Science.

  • In addition to submitting a copy of the completed Master's Thesis to the MS Director, the student is required to follow all thesis formatting, content, and submission guidelines from the School of Graduate Studies.

Degree Completion Processing:

There are several forms that must be filled out and submitted by the appropriate deadlines in order for the student who has fulfilled the above requirements to receive a Master's Degree. It is the student's responsibility that all necessary paperwork be completed on time. Information and forms can be obtained from the MS Administrative Assistant


FAQ

What do I need to do to apply?

How do I apply?

What are the admissions requirements?

Are there any minimal GRE or TOEFL scores needed to get admitted into the MS programs?

Do I increase my chances to get accepted if I apply early?

Is it more benefitial to submit recommendation letters from academia or from industry?

Is my application still considered if some of the required information, for instance one of the recommendation letters, is missing?

What are the application deadlines for MS Program?

How do I register?

Practical Training (CPT)


What do I need to do to apply?

1) Take the General Graduate Record Examinations (GRE): [verbal, quantitative, analytical writing]
2) Obtain 3 letters of reference.

3) Obtain transcripts of all academic work at college level, both undergraduate and graduate.
4) Prepare a personal statement.

5) Fill out and submit an online application, and pay the required application fee


How do I apply?

The application process is done online only through the web site http://gradstudy.rutgers.edu. You can find general information about the Graduate School New Brunswick at http://gsnb.rutgers.edu. If you want to apply to Rutgers-Newark or Rutgers-Camden, you need to contact their respective Graduate Schools.


What are the admissions requirements?

See Sections Admission Requirement of this document for details.


Are there any minimal GRE or TOEFL scores needed to get admitted into the MS programs?

Our department imposes no minimal score requirements, but please do note that the Rutgers Graduate School publishes minimal requirements for English proficiency. See http://gradstudy.rutgers.edu/information/international-students. During the admission process, we look at all the submitted material. Clearly, the better the test scores, the better the chances to get admitted.


Do I increase my chances to get accepted if I apply early?

No, that doest not impact your chances of getting accepted.


Is it more benefitial to submit recommendation letters from academia or from industry?

There is no particular preference. We will be looking for evidence that you will meet your goals in our program and can succeed in all the work involved. Your letter writers should know you and be able to assess your accomplishments and potential.


Is my application still considered if some of the required information, for instance one of the recommendation letters, is missing?

Yes, we still may consider your application, although your case may be weaker.


What are the application deadlines for MS Program?

For the Spring semester: International, September 15th. MS applications only ; United States citizens as well as green card holders: October 15th.

For the Fall semester: February 1st for International MS applicants; United States citizens and green card holders MS applicants: March 1st.

University or Department funding can not be offered to MS students at Rutgers. We expect MS students to make their own financial arrangements. However, individual research groups are sometimes able to provide funding on a case-by-case basis to admitted MS students through their research grants. Your academic advisor can give you advice about contacting individual faculty members about opportunities for support in their research group.

Students may take CS graduate courses without being enrolled in our graduate degree programs (non-degree). There are two options:

1) Students with prior undergraduate degree in CS or related fields may apply to the CS graduate program, choosing the non-degree option. All MS admissions requirements apply, including MS application deadlines.

2) Students without undergraduate degree in CS or related fields may apply to the undergraduate CS program. Once admitted as a CS undergraduate, you are allowed to take a CS graduate course if you have taken the prerequisites and have obtained permission from the course instructor.


How do I register?

Students can register only after having been officially admitted.

If you are a newly admitted foreign student, the registration material will be sent to the Graduate Program Assistant of the department, in Room 302, Hill Center, Busch Campus. All other students will receive registration material by mail at their home address. When you come to register you must have your certificate of admittance, as well as the instructions and course registration form that were sent to you. You will find out your advisor either by mail or by calling 848-445-7065.

The schedule of all graduate classes can be obtained from the department web site http://www.cs.rutgers.edu.

Changes in the schedule, new courses and special seminars not listed in this book, specific procedures for registration (such as the touch tone system), exact dates for registration, drop/add dates, etc. can all be found on the bulletin board outside Room 390 or on the above web site.